FDA: Dianne’s Fine Desserts Issues Allergy Alert on Undeclared Peanut Allergen in Product Sienna Turtle Brownie Item Number 8495241115 Lot Code 19198

chocolate-turtle-brownie
When a company announces a recall, market withdrawal, or safety alert, the FDA posts the company’s announcement as a public service. FDA does not endorse either the product or the company.
https://www.fda.gov/safety/recalls-market-withdrawals-safety-alerts/diannes-fine-desserts-issues-allergy-alert-undeclared-peanut-allergen-product-sienna-turtle-brownie?utm_campaign=Dianne%27s%20Fine%20Desserts%20Issues%20Allergy%20Alert%20on%20Undeclared%20Peanut%20Allergen&utm_medium=email&utm_source=Eloqua

Summary
Company Announcement Date:
December 31, 2019
FDA Publish Date:
December 31, 2019
Product Type:
Food & Beverages
Reason for Announcement:
May contain undeclared peanuts
Company Name:
Dianne’s Fine Desserts
Brand Name:
Sienna Bakery
Product Description:
Chocolate Turtle Brownie
Company Announcement
Dianne’s Fine Desserts of Newburyport, MA 01950 is recalling twenty six cases of product Sienna Turtle Brownie 8495241115 lot code 19198 , because it may contain undeclared peanuts. People who have an allergy or severe sensitivity to peanuts run the risk of serious or life-threatening allergic reaction if they consume these products.

Sienna Turtle Brownie 8495241115 lot code 19198 was distributed through retail wholesale clubs located in MI, IL, IN.

Sienna Turtle Brownie 8495241115 lot code 19198 can be identified by the name and product image on the tray. Tray size 17.1875×13.125×2, Lot code 19198 can be found on the top and or bottom of tray side panel.

No illnesses have been reported to date.

The recall was initiated after it was discovered that product containing peanuts was distributed in packaging that did not reveal the presence of peanuts. Subsequent investigation indicates the problem was caused by a temporary breakdown in the company’s production and packaging processes.

Consumers who have purchased Sienna Turtle Brownie 8495241115 lot code 19198 are urged to return it to the place of purchase for a full refund. Consumers with questions may contact Monday- Friday 9am-5pm EST:

Customer service: 800-435-2253 or at info@diannesfinedesserts.com.

Quality Assurance: 978-463-3824 or at Feedback@diannesfinedesserts.com

Company Contact Information
Consumers:
Customer service
800-435-2253
info@diannesfinedesserts.com

Iowa Department of Public Health say 13 travelers have returned from the western African countries of Sierra Leone, Liberia and Guinea

RSOE EDIS
RSOE Emergency and Disaster Information Service
Budapest, Hungary
RSOE EDIS ALERTMAIL
2014-11-07 06:02:50 – Biological Hazard – USA
EDIS Code: BH-20141107-45914-USA
Date&Time: 2014-11-07 06:02:50 [UTC]
Continent: North-America
Country: USA
State/Prov.: State of Iowa,
Location: ,
City: Des Moines
Number of infected people: 13

Description:
Officials with the Iowa Department of Public Health say 13 travelers have returned to the state from the western African countries of Sierra Leone, Liberia and Guinea in the past 21 days. Those countries have widespread transmission of the Ebola virus throughout the entire country, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Of the 13 in Iowa, 12 had a low risk of exposure to the virus and were allowed to resume normal activities. However, one had some risk of exposure and has been quarantined. That means the person must stay at home and take their temperature twice per day, including at least one with a public health official observing. The quarantine will remain in place for 21 days, which is the longest time the virus can remain in someone without showing symptoms. In a release, IDPH emphasized there was no risk to public safety and none of the 13 travelers have any symptoms consistent with Ebola. So far, there have been four cases of Ebola in the United States: three in Texas, including one patient who died, and one in New York, according to information posted to a page dedicated to Ebola on the Iowa Department of Public Health’s website. By comparison, the CDC reports 7,702 lab-confirmed cases and 4,941 people have died of Ebola in west Africa. Health officials say they are only providing state-level data on Ebola because the combination of county-specific information and the low number of travelers returning from west Africa could lead to the identification of individuals, which would violate state law.

The name of Hazard: Ebola hemorrhagic viral fever (EVD, sup.)
Species: Human
Status: Suspected

Posted:2014-11-07 06:02:50 [UTC]

Rabid Raccoons In Tennessee

RSOE EDIS -AlertMail

RSOE EDIS

RSOE Emergency and Disaster Information Service

Budapest, Hungary

RSOE EDIS ALERTMAIL

2014-10-22 17:43:17 – Biological Hazard – USA

EDIS Code: BH-20141022-45729-USA
Date&Time: 2014-10-22 17:43:17 [UTC]
Continent: North-America
Country: USA
State/Prov.: State of Tennessee,
Location: Watauga County,
City:
Not confirmed information!
Tennesse rabies
Description:
 
<a href='http://postimg.org/image/6hxfhjzn
Watauga County Animal Control has recently reported that a total of seven raccoons have tested positive for rabies as of late. The data illuminates an important issue that isn’t unique to neighboring Watauga County. Tennessee state law requires pet owners to keep their animals up-to-date on the life saving vaccine. Rabies is a deadly disease that poses significant risks to both humans and animals, risks that can be greatly lessened or even eliminated through routine vaccination. All species of mammals are susceptible to the rabies virus however; animals like raccoons, skunks, foxes, coyotes and bats are common culprits. Transmission of rabies occurs when an animal carrying the virus transmits salvia (through a bite) to a healthy animal. As a result, any suspicious wounds found on pets should be carefully inspected by a veterinarian to ensure that no further treatment is necessary. The only proven effective method to protect your pets from rabies is preventative vaccination. There is no cure for rabies and if an animal contracts the virus, it must be euthanized. It is important to note that if your pet is bitten by a wild animal and is current on its rabies vaccine, it still must receive a booster shot immediately. According to Tennessee law, the vaccinated animal must also be quarantined and observed for 45 days following the bite. If your pet is bitten by a rabid animal and it does not have a current rabies vaccine it must either be euthanized immediately or the owner can opt to pay for a lengthy quarantine. However, during the period of quarantine, if the unvaccinated pet begins to display symptoms of the rabies virus, it will still be euthanized. Erratic and behavior are the most common indicators that an animal has become infected with rabies however, human beings can also contract the rabies virus if bitten by an infected animal.
The name of Hazard: Rabies (racoon)
Species: Animal
Status: Confirmed